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Olbers Paradox

8 thoughts on “ Olbers Paradox

  1. noun Astronomy. the paradox that if the universe consisted of an infinite number of stars equally distributed through space, then every line of sight would come from a star and the night sky would glow uniformly, which is observationally not true.
  2. The history of Olbers’ paradox goes back at least as far as Johannes Kepler, who posed it in If the universe is infinite, argued Kepler, containing an infinite number of stars distributed.
  3. The question is usually called Olbers' Paradox, (after German astronomer Heinrich W. Olbers), and it can be stated pretty simply: Why is the night sky dark? The reason that this question is so important is because its answer can tell us about the distribution of stars and galaxies in the universe.
  4. This problem greatly troubled astronomers and became known as "Olbers' Paradox." A paradox is a statement that seems to disagree with itself. To try to explain the paradox, some 19th century scientists thought that dust clouds between the stars must be absorbing a lot of the starlight so it .
  5. Olbers paradox är en paradox inom kosmologin, som uppmärksammar att det inte är lika ljust överallt på himlen, som den genomsnittliga stjärnans ljusstyrka. Den tyske läkaren och privatastronomen Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers var inte först () med att fråga varför det .
  6. Olbers' name sticks to this paradox for two reasons: 1. He gave the question it's most succinct phrasing: if the universe is infinite then wherever you look your gaze should hit upon a star. 2. He put forth his study in a paper and Cheseaux put his in an appendix of a book about comets. But it is not the case that Olbers came up with a new and.
  7. The Olbers' paradox is a photometric paradox, which consists in the fact that if the Universe is uniformly filled with stars, and infinite in space and time, then the brightness of the sky (including the night) should be equal to the brightness of the solar disk.

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